China in My Eyes

50 years of continued friendship

Tibet

Colin has been to Tibet a few times, in 1985, 1997, and in 2002. When he visits any area, he is never shy to talk to the locals and jots down all he sees. Occasionally, he takes a few pictures.

Below are just a few images of his time in 2002. They show a surprisingly strong survival of Tibetan culture.

Tibetan buildings

Tibetan monastery

Tibetan Man

Tibetan man

Tibetan home

Tibetan oven in a monastery

Tibetan view

Tibetan view

Tibetan rock wall

Tibetan rock wall with traditional open-air statue and prayer flags

Colin with some Tibetan monks

Colin with two Tibetan monks

Tibetan women

Tibetan women and children

Tibetan yaks

Tibetan yaks

Tibetan Drama

Tibetan drama dates from the fifteenth century and is the oldest form of minority ethnic drama in China. It is characterised by smooth and melismatic singing method and extensive use of masks, with the stories about the struggle between good and evil and based on Tibetan history or Buddhist themes.

For more information, See Chinese Drama, Chapter 8, by Colin Mackerras published by New World Press, Beijing in 1990.

Tibetan drama dates from the fifteenth century and is the oldest form of minority ethnic drama in China. It is characterised by smooth and melismatic singing method and extensive use of masks, with the stories about the struggle between good and evil and based on Tibetan history or Buddhist themes.

Traditionally, Tibetan opera took place under a tent, as in this picture. The audience sat around the players. In this particular case, I chanced upon this performance, because I heard the sounds of the singers from a way off and went to have a look.

 

Tibetan drama dates from the fifteenth century and is the oldest form of minority ethnic drama in China. It is characterised by smooth and melismatic singing method and extensive use of masks, with the stories about the struggle between good and evil and based on Tibetan history or Buddhist themes.

Dance by masked dancers is very important in Tibetan opera. This picture shows several under a tent, with the audience sitting in the background.

Tibetan drama dates from the fifteenth century and is the oldest form of minority ethnic drama in China. It is characterised by smooth and melismatic singing method and extensive use of masks, with the stories about the struggle between good and evil and based on Tibetan history or Buddhist themes.

Tibetan opera still takes place under a tent in the open air, a favourite site being the Dalai Lama’s palace, the Norbu Lingka. However, sometimes modern theatre show strongly reformed versions. At one time, revolutionary themes were even adopted, but these are no longer popular.

Please follow these links on Tibetans if viewing on a mobile device

The Tibetans

 Qinghai Tibetans